Moving from the USA to Australia

Moving from the USA to Australia

29th Aug 2017

We’re noticing an increasing number of medics currently working in the United States showing an interest in moving to Australia. Of course everyone will have their own unique reasons for considering a move ‘down under’, however these five factors seem to play some of the biggest roles in convincing US doctors that their careers could be enhanced by a move to the other side of the world.

 

Better Working Hours

 

Australia is famous for many things: Kangaroos, surfing, giant spiders...and a laid back attitude. That attitude forms an essential backbone of working life in the country. The Australian lifestyle is built around securing a healthy work/life balance, and that is music to the ears of overworked medics currently stifled in the American healthcare system.

 

Typically Australian working weeks will be shorter than those endured in the US and holiday entitlements will be greater, whilst weekend work isn’t as common, and split shifts are about as rare as rain in the outback. This can make the country ideal for people looking to take things down a notch, without losing their professional edge.

 

Better Working Conditions

 

Nobody is claiming that US Hospitals are backwards, far from it, however the working conditions in Australia are commonly better than the average experienced by American medics.

 

The country’s low population density means that facilities can be smaller, less crowded and well looked after. Further to this, recent state investment means that most are modern, or have been recently renovated, making them a more than comfortable working environment.

 

An Actively Promoted Healthy Lifestyle

 

Sport plays a massive part in the life of Australians, just as it does in the States, however there is a slight difference. The majority of Aussies like to partake in sport regularly, with the country’s sundrenched climate, and miles of beaches making it perfect for living an active lifestyle.

 

That is reflected in the country’s obesity rate, which is 41% lower than it is in the United States.

 

A Similar Culture

 

What appeals most to many Americans about a move to Australia is how similar the country is to their homeland.

 

Currently the Middle East and East Asia are some of the biggest markets looking for Western trained medics, however many Westerners may find it difficult to adapt to their very different cultures - especially if they haven’t worked abroad previously. That is where Australia comes in. There is no language barrier to overcome, the country looks similar, there are similar shops, brands and food choices and the legal system is similar.

 

This can also be where some people go wrong however. They expect Australia to be just like the US with more desert and kangaroos! It isn’t, and the country has a totally different culture. Prepare for that just as you would if you were moving to a Gulf state, or the Far East. The adaption might be easier, however that doesn’t excuse going in blindly unaware of what to expect.

 

People’s Attitude to their Health & Medical Professionals

 

Often in America people neglect their health concerns, or just pay little attention to unhealthy lifestyle choices that are potentially leading to them being at a greater risk of a range of conditions. Medical advice is often ignored, and many people don’t have a hugely supportive attitude towards their own health, or medical professionals.

 

In Australia, partially down to the healthcare system’s funding model, this is totally different. Aussies do care about their health, and will listen and respond to medical advice in order to keep themselves in good shape.

 

This can be a refreshing change for many people used to working in America, and can play a big role in making a move appealing to medics in need of a change.

 

We’ve recently agreed an exciting new deal with a client in Western Australia. To register your interest, and for job alerts, get in touch and register on our website today. A dream move could be closer than you might imagine.

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