Beware of Fake Job Offer Scams from the UAE

Medical Jobs

Karen Wilson

There have been fake job offer scams for a long time in the United Arab Emirates, but most have been issued by imposters who have frauduently used genuine company logos and names to attract innocent candidates into scams. The job offer is a bait to trick the candidate into sending money to travel or immigration agents to secure visas and work permits which are allegedly required to take up the position offered by the company and accepted by the candidate. The agents naturaly vanish once the funds have been remitted, the visa or work permit never arrives and the poor candidate eventually realises that the whole thing was an elaborate deception and that the job offer was fake. 

In these scams, the warning sign is that the job offers are usually exceptional with salaries and benefit packages which are often double the going rate, with first class travel and accommodation thrown in. When things look too good to be true, they are usually are!

It has come to our attention that the scam has been taken to new heights by a hospital called MEDICAL CONSULTANCY CENTER (MCC) UAE. Has anyone heard of this hospital? It has its own website which ranks the number 1 slot in google and claims to be authorised by the Ministry of Health in Abu Dhabi, UAE. It boasts accreditation by the prestigious Joint Commission International (JCI) of the USA, flashing the gold JCIA badge on the home page of the website. It promotes multiple services including paediatric checks, vaccinations for Hajj and Ummra, wellness check packages. laser vision correction, plastic surgery, endocrinology, dermatology and a history of excellence going back to its founding in 1981. It has photographs of many doctors in various specialisms with detailed biographies of their education, experience, skills and scope of practice. But is it real?

 

The Home Page of Medical Consulting Centre, Abu Dhabi, UAE

Medical Consultancy Centre

If one looks closely at the home page, the main contact number is a mobile phone +971 524973064. If you call this number, it is answered by a man who refuses to give his name. This is a giveaway because real hospitals have professional swicthboard operators who are happy to confirm their identities. They also use landlines. 

Feel reassured by this?

Medical Consultancy Centre Home Page

 

Fake Job Offers

A candidate received the offer below. The offer is flanked by the logo and various stamps and a reference number to confirm its authenticity. Its various terms are highlighted in red and blue ink and the offer seems to be wildly generous for such an apparently small hospital. The salary is paid in US dollars and not in the local Emirati dirham. It provides first class travel and accommodation and multiple other benefits. It is in monetary terms, better than the going rate for such a position in Abu Dhabi at the type of facility this organisation seems to be. However, the hospital is a fake. A brief review of the website of the JCI lists all the accredited hospitals in the country and there is no mention of Medical Consultancy Clinic (MCC).
 

 

How To Spot Fake Job Offers

  1. OFFER TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE: the salary and allowances are significantly higher than the going rates to attract you into the scam. If it looks to good to be true, it is usually fake.
  2. MOBILE PHONE DETAILS: companies and hospitals always have landlines as official numbers, not mobile phone numbers. Mobile phone numbers can be recognised as starting with 5 after the country code which is +971. A landline will start with the emirate code after the country code which is 4 for Dubai, 3 for Alin and 2 for Abu Dhabi. 
  3. FAKE COMPANY DETAILS: hospital identities can be checked on the website of the Joint Commission International if accredited and if not, they can be verified by the Ministry of Health. Don't fall for a glossy website and assume that the company is authentic.
  4. VISA AND WORK PERMIT FEES: the purpose of these scams is to extract money for immigration scams. After signing the job offer, you will be asked to remit funds to a travel or visa agent based in the UAE ostensibly to obtain the appropriate visa and work permit to allow you to take up the position which you have accepted. Once the funds are remitted, all contact with the supposed hospital and visa agent will stop and you will realise that you have been conned. Remember that genuine employers DO NOT refer international candidates to locally based agents. If you need a visa, this will be processed in your country of origin.
 

We hope this information will help to keep you safe and if you have any questions or concerns, do not hesitate to contact us for advice.